New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick turns 70 on Saturday, which is the point when he once thought he’d say goodbye to coaching.

In the NFL Films-produced “A Football Life” feature more than a decade ago, Belichick famously said: “I don’t want to be like Marv Levy and coaching when I’m in my 70s.”

But since that time, he has slowly showed signs of softening his stance.

“When I said it, maybe I didn’t know what 70 felt like,” Belichick acknowledged in a 2019 radio interview.

Now that he’s about to hit the number, Belichick leaves no doubt. He’s all-in.

Late last month at the NFL’s annual meeting, he hustled into various league meetings, and other times was seen strolling barefoot along the beach as waves rippled in. It’s a good life and he’s not ready to give it up.

“I enjoy doing it,” Belichick said, dressed in a colorful button-down shirt, shorts and sandals. “It’s a comprehensive job. It’s a lot. But it’s fun. It beats working.”

This will be Belichick’s 48th season coaching in the NFL, and 23rd as Patriots head coach. His 47 consecutive years as an NFL coach are the most in league history, passing the 45 by Dick LeBeau. The only other NFL coach with at least 40 consecutive NFL coaching seasons is Tom Moore (41).

Since coming to the Patriots in 2000, Belichick is 254-99-0 in the regular season and 30-12 in the postseason. His 97-38 record against AFC East teams (including playoffs) reflects his divisional domination for the majority of his tenure.

He’s also the longest tenured head coach with the same team, and it isn’t close. Mike Tomlin, hired by the Pittsburgh Steelers seven years after Belichick landed in New England, is next on the list.

In September, Belichick will become the fifth NFL head coach to coach a game in his 70s, joining Romeo Crennel, George Halas, Levy and Pete Carroll. In a further reflection of his longevity, consider that the other 31 teams have employed 213 head coaches (including interim and ’22 hires) since he was hired in New England. AFC East rivals have employed 28 of those coaches over that span.

As for coaching into his 70s, Belichick has noted his late father, Steve, used to say that age is just a number.

The number that means more to Belichick is 321. That’s his victory total (regular season and postseason, including his stint as Cleveland’s coach from 1991 to 1995), putting him on the cusp of moving past Halas (324) into second place on the all-time list for coaches.

Once Belichick gets there, he’d be looking up at only Don Shula (347).

Which teams have contributed to Belichick finding himself in such lofty status? And which have traditionally given Belichick the most problems?

NFL Nation reporters bring those numbers to life.

Here is a look at how the other 31 franchises have fared overall and against Belichick during his New England tenure. Teams are ranked in order of fewest head coaches over that span to most. Interim coaches are noted with an asterisk.


Pittsburgh Steelers

Two head coaches: Bill Cowher (2000-06), Mike Tomlin (2007-present)

Record: 226-124-3 regular season, 15-12 postseason

4-12 (including 0-3 postseason) vs. Belichick: Belichick made a splash in his first game against the Steelers, leading the Patriots to a 24-17 upset win in the AFC title game of the 2001 season. Quarterback Drew Bledsoe replaced an injured Tom Brady late in the first half after Brady unseated the incumbent starter in the second game of the season. Since then, Belichick has often thwarted the Steelers on the biggest stages. He also coached the Patriots to AFC Championship Game wins over the Steelers during the 2004 and 2016 seasons. — Brooke Pryor


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Marcus Spears believes John Harbaugh’s extension with the Ravens will be good for Lamar Jackson’s prospects of staying in Baltimore.

Baltimore Ravens

Two head coaches: Brian Billick (2000-07), John Harbaugh (2008-present)

Record: 209-144 regular season, 16-11 postseason

4-9 (2-2) vs. Belichick: In a 2014 AFC playoff game, Belichick used a controversial substitution trick in a 35-31 win over the Ravens. He lined up just four offensive linemen and declared a normally eligible receiver as ineligible to keep the Baltimore defense off balance. Ravens coach John Harbaugh said it was “clearly deceptive,” and the NFL made it illegal a couple of months later. — Jamison Hensley


Seattle Seahawks

Three head coaches: Mike Holmgren (2000-08), Jim Mora Jr. (2009), Pete Carroll (2010-present)

Record: 201-151-1 regular season, 14-13 postseason

3-3 (0-1) vs. Belichick: That record includes New England’s win over Seattle in Super Bowl XLIX. The Seahawks won the two most recent meetings (2016 and ’20) thanks to goal-line stands, but no amount of regular-season success against the Patriots can erase the pain of Malcolm Butler snatching a second straight Lombardi Trophy from Seattle’s grasp with his interception of Russell Wilson at the 1-yard line. Butler had failed to stop a similar pick concept in practice before the Super Bowl, but Belichick and his defensive staff had the undrafted rookie ready for when Seattle ran it with the game on the line. — Brady Henderson


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Stephen A. Smith calls out Matt LaFleur’s coaching ability and says Aaron Rodgers is the main reason he’s still coaching the Packers.

Green Bay Packers

Four head coaches: Mike Sherman (2000-05), Mike McCarthy (2006-18), Joe Philbin* (2018), Matt LaFleur (2019-present)

Record: 223-128-2 regular season, 14-15 postseason

2-3 vs. Belichick: It’s not any of the five meetings that the Packers probably regret the most. It’s the games that didn’t happen — in the Super Bowl. The Packers were seconds away from meeting the Patriots in Super Bowl XLIX at the end of the 2014 season when they collapsed in the NFC Championship Game loss at Seattle. And the Patriots have the Packers, in part, to blame for two of their Super Bowl losses. Both of their Super Bowl losses to the New York Giants came after the Giants knocked the Packers out of the playoffs — in the 2007 NFC title game and the 2011 NFC divisional playoffs. — Rob Demovsky


Cincinnati Bengals

Four head coaches: Bruce Coslet (2000), Dick LeBeau* (2000-02), Marvin Lewis (2003-18), Zac Taylor (2019-present)

Record: 159-190-4 regular season, 3-8 postseason

2-8 vs. Belichick: The most infamous moment came off the field — well, in the press box, to be specific. Before the Patriots played the Bengals in 2019, a New England staffer illegally filmed the Bengals during a game against Cleveland. New England was fined $1.1 million and had to forfeit a 2020 draft pick. — Ben Baby


Indianapolis Colts

Five head coaches: Jim Mora Sr. (2000-01), Tony Dungy (2002-08), Jim Caldwell (2009-11), Chuck Pagano (2012-17), Frank Reich (2018-present)

Record: 217-136 regular season, 13-14 postseason

7-16 (1-4) vs. Belichick: It was always a chess match between Peyton Manning and Belichick’s defense. Manning and the Colts got their lone playoff victory over the Patriots when Marlin Jackson’s interception of Brady in the 2006 AFC Championship Game put Indianapolis in the Super Bowl. You also can’t forget the infamous Deflategate, when the Colts, led by former general manager Ryan Grigson, accused the Patriots of lowering the inflation of game balls to help Brady during the 2014 season. — Mike Wells


New Orleans Saints

Five head coaches: Jim Haslett (2000-05), Sean Payton (2006-11; 2013-21), Joe Vitt* (2012), Aaron Kromer* (2012), Dennis Allen (2022)

Record: 204-149 regular season, 10-9 postseason

2-4 vs. Belichick: The Saints enjoyed one of the greatest wins in franchise history against Belichick on Monday Night Football during their 2009 Super Bowl season when Drew Brees posted a perfect passer rating. That week, Saints coach Sean Payton famously dressed as Belichick and imitated his voice as a clever way to critique and motivate his players. Payton has always praised the Patriots as a model for building his team, and the two often held joint practices. — Mike Triplett


Philadelphia Eagles

Five head coaches: Andy Reid (2000-12), Chip Kelly (2013-15) Pat Shurmur* (2015), Doug Pederson (2016-2020), Nick Sirianni (2021-present)

Record: 203-148-2 regular season, 14-13 postseason

2-5 (1-1) vs. Belichick: The greatest moment in franchise history came at the expense of Belichick and Brady, with the Eagles downing the Patriots 41-33 in Super Bowl LII. The Patriots mysteriously benched starting cornerback Malcolm Butler in that game, and it proved costly. Belichick has enjoyed his share of success against Philly, though. He got his third championship ring as head coach with a 24-21 win over the Eagles in Super Bowl XXXIX. — Tim McManus


Dallas Cowboys

Five head coaches: Dave Campo (2000-02), Bill Parcells (2003-06), Wade Phillips (2007-10), Jason Garrett* (2010-19), Mike McCarthy (2020-present)

Record: 186-167 regular season, 3-8 postseason

1-5 vs. Belichick: Before last year’s 33-27 overtime win against the Patriots, the Cowboys had difficulty scoring more than one touchdown against New England, having done so in just one of the previous five meetings (2007). Of course, that win was perhaps the high-water mark of the 2021 season. Dak Prescott suffered a calf strain on the winning TD throw to CeeDee Lamb and the offense was not the same the rest of the season. — Todd Archer


Tennessee Titans

Five head coaches: Jeff Fisher (2000-10), Mike Munchak (2011-13), Ken Whisenhunt (2014-15), Mike Mularkey* (2015-17), Mike Vrabel (2018-present)

Record: 183-170 regular season, 5-9 postseason

3-8 (1-2) vs. Belichick: The Titans have historically struggled against Belichick. The worst game was a 59-0 beatdown in New England in 2009. However, since Vrabel took over as Tennessee’s coach in 2018, the Titans are 2-1. That includes a road win over the Patriots in the playoffs after the 2019 season. That loss was Brady’s final game as a Patriot. Vrabel used a Belichick trick against his former coach in the game when the Titans intentionally took a delay of game penalty then a false start to bleed extra time off the clock late in the fourth quarter. — Turron Davenport


Carolina Panthers

Five head coaches: George Seifert (2000-01), John Fox (2002-10), Ron Rivera (2011-19), Perry Fewell* (2019), Matt Rhule (2020-present)

Record: 167-185-1 regular season, 8-7 postseason

3-4 (0-1) vs. Belichick: The biggest loss by far was the 32-29 setback in the Super Bowl following the 2003 season. Brady led New England to a last-second field goal after Carolina kicker John Kasay sent the kickoff out of bounds following a tying touchdown. Carolina actually had good success against Belichick with Cam Newton at quarterback. He was 2-0 with wins in 2013 and ’17. — David Newton


Kansas City Chiefs

Six head coaches: Gunther Cunningham (2000), Dick Vermeil (2001-05), Herm Edwards (2006-08), Todd Haley (2009-11), Romeo Crennel* (2011-12), Andy Reid (2013-present)

Record: 192-161 regular season, 9-10 postseason

5-8 (0-2) vs. Belichick: The Chiefs are on a two-game winning streak against Belichick and the Patriots, but New England has wins in both playoff meetings. Included is a 37-31 overtime loss to the Patriots in the AFC Championship Game after the 2018 season in which the Chiefs never got a chance with the ball in the extra period. — Adam Teicher


Minnesota Vikings

Six head coaches: Dennis Green (2000-01), Mike Tice* (2001-05), Brad Childress (2006-10), Leslie Frazier* (2010-13), Mike Zimmer (2014-21), Kevin O’Connell (2022)

Record: 180-171-2 regular season, 5-8 postseason

1-5 vs. Belichick: The Vikings’ only win against Belichick came in his third game with the team, part of the Patriots’ 0-4 start to the 2000 season. The Vikings lost their next five matchups against him, including a 2010 game at Gillette Stadium that so frustrated receiver Randy Moss that he declined to travel home with the team and was soon released. — Kevin Seifert


Los Angeles Chargers

Six head coaches: Mike Riley (2000-01), Marty Schottenheimer (2002-06), Norv Turner (2007-12), Mike McCoy (2013-16), Anthony Lynn (2017-20), Brandon Staley (2021-present)

Record: 178-175 regular season, 5-7 postseason

3-11 (0-3) vs. Belichick: The Patriots have a seven-game winning streak against the Chargers that dates well back into their time in San Diego, and Belichick has wins in all three playoff games. The Chargers have not beaten Belichick since 2008, and five of the seven most recent games were decided by at least eight points. — Adam Teicher


Chicago Bears

Six head coaches: Dick Jauron (2000-03), Lovie Smith (2004-12), Marc Trestman (2013-14), John Fox (2015-17), Matt Nagy (2018-21), Matt Eberflus (2022)

Record: 171-182 regular season, 3-6 postseason

1-5 vs. Belichick: The Bears haven’t faced Belichick since 2018 and have lost five straight meetings to the Patriots dating to 2002. Chicago played the 2002 season at the University of Illinois while Soldier Field was under renovation and allowed one of the best comebacks of the Belichick era during the Week 10 meeting. Brady and the Patriots scored 27 second-half points to top Chicago 33-30, a game that came down to two reviewed plays and no remaining timeouts for the Bears on New England’s last possession to win the game. — Courtney Cronin


New York Giants

Seven head coaches: Jim Fassel (2000-03), Tom Coughlin (2004-15), Ben McAdoo (2016-17), Steve Spagnuolo* (2017), Pat Shurmur (2018-19), Joe Judge (2020-21), Brian Daboll (2022)

Regular season: 168-185; Postseason: 10-6

3-4 (2-0) vs. Belichick: The Giants might have a losing record against Belichick, but they have the two biggest wins — Super Bowls XLII and XLVI. Might as well discount the rest. Coughlin, Eli Manning and Co. ruined the Patriots’ undefeated season in the first one. It still bothers Brady to this day. Coughlin, meanwhile, is one of the few coaches to have bragging rights against Belichick with a 3-2 record. — Jordan Raanan


Arizona Cardinals

Seven head coaches: Vince Tobin (2000), Dave McGinnis* (2000-03), Dennis Green (2004-06), Ken Whisenhunt (2007-12), Bruce Arians (2013-17), Steve Wilks (2018), Kliff Kingsbury (2019-present)

Record: 156-195-2 regular season, 5-5 postseason

1-4 vs. Belichick: The only highlight against Belichick came on the road in 2012, when New England kicker Stephen Gostkowski missed a potential winning field goal in the final seconds of Arizona’s 20-18 win — Josh Weinfuss


New York Jets

Seven head coaches: Al Groh (2000), Herm Edwards (2001-05), Eric Mangini (2006-08), Rex Ryan (2009-14), Todd Bowles (2015-18), Adam Gase (2019-20), Robert Saleh (2021-present)

Record: 154-199 regular season, 6-6 postseason

11-35 (1-1) vs. Belichick: The history of the Jets can’t be written without at least one chapter on Belichick, who famously quit the team in January 2000, on the day he was supposed to succeed Bill Parcells as the “HC of the NYJ.” Since then, he has tortured the Jets and their fans. In fact, they have an active 12-game losing streak, with an embarrassing average margin of defeat — 20 points. Preceding the current skid was the “Butt Fumble” game in 2012, another laugher. The highlight was a stunning upset by New York in the 2010 divisional playoffs. Maybe the Jets can take some solace in knowing they got Belichick in big trouble in 2007, blowing the whistle on his illegal videotaping practices — better known as SpyGate. — Rich Cimini


Houston Texans

Seven head coaches: Dom Capers (2002-05), Gary Kubiak (2006-13), Wade Phillips* (2013), Bill O’Brien (2014-20), Romeo Crennel* (2020), David Culley (2021), Lovie Smith (2022)

Record: 139-182 regular season, 4-6 postseason

3-11 (0-2) vs. Belichick: Every game the Texans have played against the Patriots in their franchise history has been against Belichick. Five of those losses came consecutively during Bill O’Brien’s Texans tenure. The former Patriots assistant finally beat Belichick in 2019, his last full season in Houston. — Sarah Barshop


Denver Broncos

Eight head coaches: Mike Shanahan (2000-08), Josh McDaniels (2009-10), Eric Studesville* (2010), John Fox (2011-14), Gary Kubiak (2015-16), Vance Joseph (2017-18), Vic Fangio (2019-21), Nathan Hackett (2022)

Record: 194-159 regular season, 7-8 postseason

10-10 (3-1) vs. Belichick: The Broncos have fared better than most, especially during Shanahan’s tenure (5-3 against Belichick) and Denver’s 3-1 postseason record against the Patriots includes two wins in AFC Championship Games. The highlight would be the final Brady-Peyton Manning matchup in the AFC Championship Game to close out the 2015 season. The Broncos’ defense battered Brady with four sacks and 20 quarterback hits on the way to a 20-18 win that was only secured when cornerback Bradley Roby intercepted Brady on a 2-point conversion attempt with 11 seconds left. — Jeff Legwold


Los Angeles Rams

Eight head coaches: Mike Martz (2000-05), Joe Vitt* (2005), Scott Linehan (2006-08), Jim Haslett* (2008), Steve Spagnuolo (2009-11), Jeff Fisher (2012-16), John Fassel* (2016), Sean McVay (2017-present)

Record: 166-186-1 regular season, 10-7 postseason

2-6 (0-2) vs. Belichick: Not all of these six losses are like the other. The Rams lost two Super Bowls to Belichick and the Patriots, including Belichick’s first Lombardi Trophy following the 2001 season. That was the most memorable matchup as it came down to a last-second field goal and ended up being the birth of the Patriots dynasty. — Nick Wagoner


San Francisco 49ers

Eight head coaches: Steve Mariucci (2000-02), Dennis Erickson (2003-04), Mike Nolan (2005-08), Mike Singletary* (2008-10), Jim Tomsula* (2010; 2015), Jim Harbaugh (2011-14), Chip Kelly (2016), Kyle Shanahan (2017-present)

Record: 164-188-1 regular season, 10-7 postseason

2-3 vs. Belichick: Because of how NFL scheduling works, the 49ers haven’t seen much of Belichick in his New England tenure but the teams’ meeting on Dec. 16, 2012 stands out as one of the most entertaining games in recent Niners’ memory. In a wild 41-34 victory, San Francisco jumped to a 31-3 lead before the Patriots mustered a spirited comeback to tie it at 31. Colin Kaepernick’s 38-yard touchdown pass to Michael Crabtree gave the 49ers the lead for good, moving San Francisco to 10-3-1 and dropping the Patriots to 10-4. — Nick Wagoner


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Marcus Spears speaks on how Tom Brady’s return makes the Buccaneers the NFC South favorites.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Eight head coaches: Tony Dungy (2000-01), Jon Gruden (2002-08), Raheem Morris (2009-11), Greg Schiano (2012-13), Lovie Smith (2014-15), Dirk Koetter (2016-18), Bruce Arians (2019-21), Todd Bowles (2022)

Record: 162-191 regular season, 8-5 postseason

2-4 vs. Belichick: The Bucs’ first win against Belichick — a 21-16 victory in Week 1 in 2000 — was Belichick’s first game as head coach for the Patriots. Hall of Famer Warren Sapp, Marcus Jones, Shelton Quarles and Steve White sacked Drew Bledsoe six times — tied for third-most in the Belichick era — and Mike Alstott rushed for two touchdowns. The second win came in 2021 — Brady’s return to Foxborough, Massachusetts — which was sealed when Patriots kicker Nick Folk a missed 56-yard field goal attempt. — Jenna Laine


Atlanta Falcons

Nine head coaches: Dan Reeves (2000-03), Wade Phillips* (2003), Jim Mora Jr. (2004-06), Bobby Petrino (2007), Emmitt Thomas* (2007), Mike Smith (2008-14), Dan Quinn (2015-20), Raheem Morris* (2020), Arthur Smith (2021-present)

Record: 175-177-1 regular season, 6-8 postseason

0-7 (0-1) vs. Belichick: When Atlanta sees Belichick, it usually goes poorly. While everyone knows the lore of 28-3 and what came next in Super Bowl LI in their only playoff meeting, four of the seven Falcons losses to Belichick in New England were double-digit defeats. The Falcons should be thankful Belichick resides in the AFC, because otherwise it likely would be much, much worse. — Michael Rothstein


Jacksonville Jaguars

Nine head coaches: Tom Coughlin (2000-02), Jack Del Rio (2003-11), Mel Tucker* (2011), Mike Mularkey (2012), Gus Bradley (13-16), Doug Marrone* (2016-20), Urban Meyer (2021), Darrell Bevell* (2021), Doug Pederson (2022)

Record: 131-222 regular season, 3-3 postseason

1-9 (0-3) vs. Belichick: The Jaguars’ only victory over Belichick was in Week 2 in 2018, a 31-20 home win. That was minimal payback for a disappointing loss in the AFC title game eight months earlier. The Jaguars had a 10-point fourth-quarter lead in that game, but Brady led the Patriots on two TD drives capped by passes to Danny Amendola. In Jacksonville that game will always be remembered as the “Myles Jack Wasn’t Down” game. Jack, a linebacker, had stripped running back Dion Lewis and was headed for a touchdown but officials blew the play dead. They erroneously ruled that Jack did recover the fumble but was down. That would have given the Jaguars a 17-point lead in the fourth quarter and might have sent them to the franchise’s first Super Bowl. — Michael DiRocco


Buffalo Bills

10 head coaches: Wade Phillips (2000), Gregg Williams (2001-03), Mike Mularkey (2004-05), Dick Jauron (2006-09), Perry Fewell* (2009), Chan Gailey (2010-12), Doug Marrone (2013-14), Rex Ryan (2015-16), Anthony Lynn* (2016), Sean McDermott (2017-present)

Record: 161-192 regular season, 3-4 postseason

9-36 (1-0) vs. Belichick: Things have moved in the Bills’ direction, but for almost all of Belichick’s tenure, New England has dominated these meetings. There have been countless memorable games over that stretch, including this past year with an impressive coaching moment from Belichick resulting in a 14-10 win in a windy Orchard Park, New York, and later the Bills winning the teams’ first playoff meeting since 1963. — Alaina Getzenberg


Washington Commanders

10 head coaches: Norv Turner (2000), Terry Robiskie* (2000), Marty Schottenheimer (2001), Steve Spurrier (2002-03), Joe Gibbs (2004-07), Jim Zorn (2008-09), Mike Shanahan (2010-13), Jay Gruden (2014-19), Bill Callahan* (2019), Ron Rivera (2020-present)

Record: 146-206-1 regular season, 1-5 postseason

1-4 vs. Belichick: The last Washington coach to lead a win over Belichick? Steve Spurrier in 2003 when quarterback Patrick Ramsey outdueled Brady in a 20-17 win. The Patriots’ QB threw three interceptions with two touchdown passes that day. In their next four meetings, all New England wins, Brady threw 11 touchdown passes and just three picks. Belichick faced four different Washington coaches and five different quarterbacks in those meetings. — John Keim


Miami Dolphins

11 head coaches: 11 — Dave Wannstedt (2000-04), Jim Bates* (2004), Nick Saban (2005-06), Cam Cameron (2007), Tony Sparano (2008-11), Todd Bowles* (2011), Joe Philbin (2012-15), Dan Campbell* (2015), Adam Gase (2016-18), Brian Flores (2019-21), Mike McDaniel (2022)

Record: 168-185 regular season, 1-4 postseason

18-26 vs. Belichick: Flores stood out against his former boss the past three seasons, holding a 4-2 record over Belichick and becoming the only Belichick disciple with a winning record against him. With a win against Brady in his last regular-season start as a Patriot (2019), the “Miami Miracle” (2018) and the exhilarating Wildcat debut (2008), the Dolphins have had their share of highlights against Belichick. — Marcel Louis-Jacques


Detroit Lions

11 head coaches: Bobby Ross (2000), Gary Moeller* (2000), Marty Mornhinweg (2001-02), Steve Mariucci (2003-05), Dick Jauron* (2005), Rod Marinelli (2006-08), Jim Schwartz (2009-13), Jim Caldwell (2014-17), Matt Patricia (2017-20), Darrell Bevell* (2020), Dan Campbell (2021-present)

Record: 122-229-2 regular season, 0-3 postseason

2-4 vs. Belichick: Detroit hasn’t had much success against the Belichick-led Patriots with just two victories throughout his tenure. However, Detroit did beat New England 26-10 in its last matchup at home on Sept. 23, 2018, while under the direction of coach Matt Patricia, a mentee of Belichick. — Eric Woodyard


Las Vegas Raiders

12 head coaches: Jon Gruden (2000-01; 2018-21), Bill Callahan (2002-03), Norv Turner (2004-05), Art Shell (2006), Lane Kiffin (2007-08), Tom Cable* (2008-10), Hue Jackson (2011), Dennis Allen (2012-14), Tony Sparano* (2014), Jack Del Rio (2015-17), Rich Bisaccia* (2021), Josh McDaniels (2022)

Record: 143-210 regular season, 4-5 postseason

1-7 (0-1) vs. Belichick: The futility began on a snowy New England night in the divisional round of the 2001 playoffs. Yes, the Tuck Rule Game. It launched a dynasty in New England and hastened the Raiders’ demise. At least Las Vegas pilfered McDaniels as head coach, right? Hey, even McDaniels admitted Brady fumbled — that has to count for something. — Paul Gutierrez


Cleveland Browns

12 head coaches: Chris Palmer (2000), Butch Davis (2001-04), Terry Robiskie* (2004), Romeo Crennel (2005-08), Eric Mangini (2009-10), Pat Shurmur (2011-12), Rob Chudzinski (2013), Mike Pettine (2014-15), Hue Jackson (2016-18), Gregg Williams* (2018), Freddie Kitchens (2019), Kevin Stefanski (2020-present)

Record: 118-234-1 regular season, 1-2 postseason

2-8 vs. Belichick: The Browns have struggled against their former man, who was Cleveland’s head coach before the franchise moved to Baltimore. The Browns won the first matchup with New England in 2000 19-11. But they have won only once since, losing 45-7 in New England last season. — Jake Trotter